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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see any reason why someone should be able to purchase military style or body armor or weapons. only the police and the military should have that. >> let's start off. you've been giving me a holler on twitter about this. you are a big gun fan. explain to me why bob costas is wrong? >> it boils down to the ability to protect yourself, piers. when you look at what is what happening in syria with the threat of chemical weapons. the only reason they're not going to use it is because someb
in close touch and follow this. thank you. >>> in new york, police have a woman in custody in connection with a case of the man pushed to his death from a subway platform in that city. police had targeted a woman who looked like this police sketch, a heavy set woman in her 20s caught on a security camera running away after that attack on thursday. david aristo is live in new york with the latest developments on this, and pretty quick work here, wasn't it? >> seems to be. they have this woman in custody right now because that she had implicated herself, the statement we got from chief of police department spokesman paul brown. and this is a case that certainly has rocked new york. this is the second time this has taken place within the month of december. it's something that doesn't happen all that often here in new york. 8.5 million people in the city and many, many people take the subway. so to have something like this take place, you would think it's got the city in sort of a tizzy. this thing happened in queens. the woman was walking back and forth. it's not clear if the one that they
's wednesday, december 12th. look at that shot of new york city. >> wow. >> it's dark at 6:00 on the east coast. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in new york city, we have msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. >> in my ear, mika. >> no, he was at the white house. >> i don't understand. where's t.j.? >> he's off today. >> why's that? >> he was busy. he went to the white house. >> that's great. you know, alex went to the white house, too. >> and drove back himself. >> let me get this straight. so alex goes to the white house last night. >> mm-hmm. >> because, you know, right-wing bloggers, we actually -- that's how we get our talking points. they go down -- valerie and david axelrod together make a big pot roast for us. >> mm-hmm. >> and lots of gravy. and we sit around eating it. and i, of course, say okay, give me extra gravy. i'm good with it. >> right. >> best sweet tea i've ever had. >> there's a give and take. >> actually, it was a christmas party. go ahead and do your blog. you sure as hell didn't get mitt romney to like it. they're not attacking me. i wouldn't know. i don't read
the world. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fall out of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more effective controls on the sale of guns. >> roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see in anyone should be able to purchase military style or body armor or weapons. >> let's start off. you are a big gun fan. pln to me why bob costas is wrong? >> it boils down to the ability to protect yourself piers. when you look at what is what happening in syria with the use of chemical weapons. somebody else has a threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner. you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or fi
with a group of u.s. hedge funds won't need to be heard in a u.s. court. the appeals division of the new york supreme court has ruled there isn't enough connection between those events and the new york state to justify the case being held there. the court ruling noted that germany's legal system would provide an adequate alternative. certainly not the last chapter in that saga. >> no. probably not the last saga in this, either. hewlett packard has suggested the u.s. is looking into questionable accounting practices. last month's ceo meg whitman used that as the basis for a nearly $9 billion write-down. the ex ceo mike lynch continues to defend the company's accounting practices. hewlett packard, a little higher in german trade this morning. but down by 20% of its value. >> not a pretty quarter for hewlett packard. >>> brent crude has climbed above the $100 a barrel mark as u.s. lawmakers attempt to avoid the fiscal cliff. but crude is poised to post its smallest gain in three years. wti is set to post its first annual last in four years. ian, welcome. we've seen this sharp decline in oil pric
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an ex
've been investing for around 20 years, he says. compared to new york and london, investments in china are relatively new. the markets he said are dominated by small time chinese investors who bet more on gossip and behavior rather than company profit. trading halls here feel like gambling debs. people in trading rooms like this one with just wiling their time away. most of them are stereo scared to get back into the market. chinese investor res paralyzed by the worst economic growth since the 1990s. historically, the markets here have gone through booms and busts, but have never gained the stad temperature of the economy. now the world's second largest. the problem is, people don't trust what they're buying. that reality was exposed by a accounting scandals in the u.s., involving new york listed chinese companies currently under scrutiny by the securities and exchange economic oh sec. >> the chinese regulatory authority only do themselves a disfavor by not being more cooperative with other international regulators such as the s.e.c. and then investors back home here will pick up on th
'm melissa lee live from the new york stock exchange. negative across the board, looks like we're going to lose about 8.5% on the dow. we're watching for headlines out of an ecd press report. our road map this morning starting with apple, cratering on its biggest decline yesterday on four years, closing just pennies off the lows of the session. the stock continues lower premarket as investors watch the death cross watch. >> a cnbc exclusive, tim geithner says over the cliff is a must. >> bank of england and ecb keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, th
.97. down, yes, but still the highest ever price for early december. we've got new york state at the highest of the continental u.s. and missouri is the lowest. 3.01. missouri has the only major city we found with the average price of regular we called a two handle. and in the next hour, the gas buddy joins us and where you can find the cheapest gas in your area. and 10:45. new figures from the u.s. census bureau shows about 100,000 more people left california than moved in. that's a net out migration in 2011. shockingly enough, mike reagan was not one of them. he joins us now bright and early from los angeles. thank you for getting up so early in los angeles, we appreciate it, mike. now-- >> you've got it. thank you very much. stuart: i thought i'd get you out, sorry about that. why are all of these people leaving? conventional wisdom has it, it's taxes, taxes, taxes. is it something more? >> how about lack the education? the school system used to be number one is now 49th in the country and taxes another reason for it, cost of living another reason for it and no vision into the future that
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
responding to a fire in upstate new york. that happened early this morning not because of the fire they were trying to put out, but police in webster, new york say they were shot. three homes burned police say for hours gunshots stopped the firefighters from putting out the fires, forced police s.w.a.t. teams to evacuate the homes in the area. just in, police say the shooter who killed the two firefighters is also dead. they say he set a trap for those firefighters. >>> the nra is standing tough on its opposition to new gun laws in the aftermath of the killings in newtown, connecticut. the ceo went on "meet the press" to defend his call for armed guards in every american school, but here's what a couple of front pages said about wane laperriere. one called him a gun nut and another one headlined with the crazy heest man on earth. laperriere he is not backing down. watch. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what the american people -- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. >
house would be burn down. the tea boycott spread to other cities, down the coast to new york, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british r
in a new york city hotel room back in 2011. remember this? after problems cropped up with her story, according to the prosecutors, the da's office dropped all charges in the case. but she pressed ahead with the civil suit. well, there is a hearing in about 45 minutes that may announce both sides have arrived at a settlement. we'll bring you that news as it happens. ♪ speak speak tongue -- [speaking in native tongue] [laughter] megyn: remember that ad? that's from the 2010 midterms from the group citizens against government waste, and it made a bunch of headlines at the time. recently, china has been on a spending spree buying up american assets. at the top of the hour, we told you about a123 that the feds gave over $100 million to you and now china's buying the company, and we're now told aig -- another company that got a cash infusion -- is selling its jet-leasing business to a group of chinese financial firms. earlier this year the biggest take over of an american company to date, amc entertainment, going to china for $2.6 billion, and in january of this year the chinese company
for us in zurich. how will this pan out, carolyn? >> well, this is all based on reports in the "new york times" that came out overnight, ross. and the most interesting piece of information in that report at least i think is the fact that the fine for ubs in connection with the libor investigation could be higher than that that was given to barclays in the summer. remember, barclays paid $450 million to settle that libor probe. and at the time that was a record fine. so now the new york teams is talking about a fine that could be even higher than that. ubs in zurich told me they have no further comment beyond the fact that they have been fully cooperating with regulatory and enforcement authorities in this libor investigation. so we didn't get any confirmation from ubs whatsoever. but the "new york times" does report that u.s. officials are hoping to complete the settlement with ubs maybe mid-december, but of course there could always be delays.is scant, but ubs is probably looking at a very hefty fine and shares in zurich this morning are underperforming the broader market, flat versus t
. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks do
or pakistani sources, but it's according to john burns of the new "new york times" that places the corruption at $2 billion to $3 billion. >> so you don't approve? >> i wouldn't vote for him, no. [laughter] >> this, of course, has been the struggle and the tragedy of pakistan over a long period of time that when something like democratic elections occur, the sighfullian leaderships that take office fail the mandate that brought them there, and they often fail in space that's pinched and constrained by the military and the intelligent purposes. we were talking before we came out that the army's out putting tv ads up bragging about the performance in the flood as if it's something they -- out of the ordinary that an army would do. >> yes. >> so are we in a phase that's going to feel repetitious? lead to another military intervention? is there an alternative future in your estimation? >> well, you know, there's a nightmare merry-go-round you see in pakistani poll sick -- politics. heafter he was made president -- we don't call them elections, we call them selections. the same selections that bro
and fiscal issues. see it live starting at 10 a.m. on c-span. >> we're at the new york state museum. this is our gallery that's dedicated to the history of september 11th and the attacks in new york at the world trade center. we decided with the gallery to tell the story, um, for the first moments of the attacks using objects and photographs from the world trade center site. this is a piece of steel from the south tower, world trade center floors 7-9. we put it in a place where the public can actually come and touch it. it gives the visitor a real tangible experience. this is a piece of steel from the north towers, floors 31-7 -- 71-74. this is a dramatically bent piece of steel. it's -- this is within ten floors of the impact of flight 11 from the north tower, and, again, you can see the openings where the windows would have been and pieces of this metal strip that would have held the aluminum clad on the front of the building. every piece of steel is marked so you know which building, which floor and which side of the building it's on. so we research that. this one we picked becau
. it was a film about death and the civil war. i went with the filmmaker, ken burns, to antietam, new york, washington. people want to talk about these ideas. there is a huge appetite for what is war? how do we understand this? i felt this was an example vacation for me as to what the humanities can be and do. i embrace what you say. i worry about the decline in humanity concentrators even in institutions like ours. there are some places where the humanities are expendable when we have to constrained resources. i think we do ourselves a terrible disservice as a country. it does not focus on how to get where it needs to go but knows where it ought to be going. that is a fundamental obligation. >> a great ending to a great panel. thank you. [applause] i'm now going to invite al hunt to come up and introduces panel. in the last session i said gene sperling would be joining us after this discussion. he was in the midst of the fiscal cliff negotiations, so hopefully he will tell us how he is protecting these important investments. >> next, a conversation about spurring investment in the marketp
. southern england was in debt. now is the obvious. -- it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in certification plus. -- in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for -- are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society
on pricing. so for more we're joined by daniel i've, senior analyst at fbr capital markets from new york. good morning. strong set of numbers from oracle. what's the read through for the rest of the market? >> it's a great read-through, especially for q4. a lot of nervousness out there. they came through with strong numbers, and it bodes well for overall technology going into 2013. >> want to look at the details here. particularly the hardware versus software shift. now, oracle, of course, the software business continues to did well. hardware, they bought sun microsystems for, what, $5 billion, $5.6 billion a couple of years ago. and that division has posted a drop in revenue every quarter since. are we to believe that they'll finally show growth here come march? >> a good question. look, the software, you know, at this point, that's the meat and potatoes. a new software license up 10% organically. you looked real strong. that's the focus for investors. the hardware continues to be a work in progress. again, they're focusing on the more profitable areas. the key is they still expect that
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)